How to determine a font's natural size?

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How to determine a font's natural size?

Gé van Gasteren-2
​Dear Evan,

A small minority of fonts are "variable", that is, they have extra information inside that can be used by some applications to generate slightly different variants of that font on the fly. Sometimes, those variants are made to adapt the appearance of the font to different point sizes, but other "variation axes" are common, like the weight of the font.
 
But in general there is no size parameter inside a font.

The x-height is not a parameter used by software, it’s a measure one can use to compare fonts: some have long ascenders and descenders compared to the "body" of the letters, and those fonts are said to have a small x-height. Otherwise I have no idea what those things you wrote mean, sorry!

(for reference here your description:)
Thanks, everyone. I just want to clarify one last point, please. Please tell me if I understand correctly.

When a font designer designs a font, they make the code dependent on several unspecified parameters, one of which is called "size". The typeface code may or may not make use of this parameter, and if it does make use of this parameter, there are no inherent requirements about how to use it and what it is supposed to mean. However, frequently in practice the size parameter is the length of the bounding box of the letter x, if this character is in the font;s domain.

When the user instantiates a font from the typeface, they pass as many arguments as there are parameters, and the argument passed to the parameter "size" is, by definition, the font's size.


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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Evan Aad
Thanks, Gé. So when I ask some typeface for a certain character at size, say, 18pt. What is it exactly that is 18pt? Samuel gave an answer before that I though I understood, but now I'm not so sure any more, since different characters have a different height, for instance, h vs. c.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 11:46 PM, Gé van Gasteren <[hidden email]> wrote:
​Dear Evan,

A small minority of fonts are "variable", that is, they have extra information inside that can be used by some applications to generate slightly different variants of that font on the fly. Sometimes, those variants are made to adapt the appearance of the font to different point sizes, but other "variation axes" are common, like the weight of the font.
 
But in general there is no size parameter inside a font. 

The x-height is not a parameter used by software, it’s a measure one can use to compare fonts: some have long ascenders and descenders compared to the "body" of the letters, and those fonts are said to have a small x-height. Otherwise I have no idea what those things you wrote mean, sorry!

(for reference here your description:)
Thanks, everyone. I just want to clarify one last point, please. Please tell me if I understand correctly.

When a font designer designs a font, they make the code dependent on several unspecified parameters, one of which is called "size". The typeface code may or may not make use of this parameter, and if it does make use of this parameter, there are no inherent requirements about how to use it and what it is supposed to mean. However, frequently in practice the size parameter is the length of the bounding box of the letter x, if this character is in the font;s domain.

When the user instantiates a font from the typeface, they pass as many arguments as there are parameters, and the argument passed to the parameter "size" is, by definition, the font's size.


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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Abraham Lee
Hi, Evan!

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 8:42 PM, Evan Aad <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks, Gé. So when I ask some typeface for a certain character at size, say, 18pt. What is it exactly that is 18pt? Samuel gave an answer before that I though I understood, but now I'm not so sure any more, since different characters have a different height, for instance, h vs. c.

Sorting out the terms in typography is confusing at first, but very important. Historically, the "point size" of a font (or typeface) was the measure of the bottom of the lowest decender (like bottom of "q" and "j") to the top of the highest ascender (like the top of "l" or "h"). Inside a modern font these two numbers exist, regardless of the shape of the glyphs (but will closely match on well-designed/defined fonts) and generally define the distance from one line to the next. This is the measurement you are technically talking about when you say "I want the font to be 18pt". In other words, the font is scaled so that the distance from the descent line to the ascent line is 18pt.

There are so many important typography 
terms to know. For me, I found the following graphic to be REALLY helpful when I was trying to understand font lingo.


Hope that helps,
Abraham

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Anton Sherwood
On 2017-7-31 21:10, Abraham Lee wrote:
> There are so many important typography
> terms to know. For me, I found the following graphic to be REALLY
> helpful when I was trying to understand font lingo.
>
> https://abigailfeniza.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/anatomy-of-type.png

It leaves me scratching my head over the difference between 'arc' and
'shoulder', or between 'counter' and 'aperture' (I had understood the
latter to mean the distance between the tips of a letter like C).

--
*\\*  Anton Sherwood  *\\*  www.bendwavy.org

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Evan Aad
In reply to this post by Gé van Gasteren-2
Thank you, Abraham, but this is not quite what I don't understand. Let me try to explain myself better.

Suppose I'm a printer living in England 200 years ago, and suppose I wish to print an upright 'a' in the 'Times' typeface. I consult a list of the available font sizes for Times and see that the available sizes are 10pt, 11pt and 14pt. I decide to use 14pt. I open the cabinet where the Times printing blocks are stored, open the drawer with the label '14pt', and take out the 'upright' tray from which I take the 'a' block.

Now suppose I am a PDF driver in a macOS operating system instructed to print an upright 14pt Times New Roman 'a' at a certain coordinate on a PDF page. What are my next steps?


On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 7:10 AM, Abraham Lee <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Evan!

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 8:42 PM, Evan Aad <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks, Gé. So when I ask some typeface for a certain character at size, say, 18pt. What is it exactly that is 18pt? Samuel gave an answer before that I though I understood, but now I'm not so sure any more, since different characters have a different height, for instance, h vs. c.

Sorting out the terms in typography is confusing at first, but very important. Historically, the "point size" of a font (or typeface) was the measure of the bottom of the lowest decender (like bottom of "q" and "j") to the top of the highest ascender (like the top of "l" or "h"). Inside a modern font these two numbers exist, regardless of the shape of the glyphs (but will closely match on well-designed/defined fonts) and generally define the distance from one line to the next. This is the measurement you are technically talking about when you say "I want the font to be 18pt". In other words, the font is scaled so that the distance from the descent line to the ascent line is 18pt.

There are so many important typography 
terms to know. For me, I found the following graphic to be REALLY helpful when I was trying to understand font lingo.


Hope that helps,
Abraham

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Joe
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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Joe
Similarly, in the computer world there are historical points of interest,
and your mentioning of "Times New Roman" is one of these.

Early printers and early Adobe had several built in fonts, sort of like
built-in cabinet drawers of fonts to choose from - an example of Adobe PDF
built-in fonts are "14":
  Courier, Courier-Bold, Courier-Oblique, Courier-BoldOblique,
  Helvetica, Helvetica-Bold, Helvetica-Oblique, Helvetica-BoldOblique,
  Times-Roman, Times-Bold, Times-Italic, Times-BoldItalic,
  Symbol, ZapfDingbats
You may notice pdf files are very small in size if you limit yourself to
these fonts since everyone should have the basic cabinet. On the other
hand, if you select an unknown font, then you need to ship the drawer with
the file so that the driver also knows how to draw this "new" font.
In terms of pdf, pdf is based on "encapsulated postscript", which is a way
of making different printers try to print the same way WYSIWYG.
eps is based on vector instructions, and not based on pixels or pts.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=encapsulated+postscript

In terms of early printers, and early computers, the MAC drivers and
printers stood-out as different, because while most other printers and
drivers talked pixels and bitmaps, the mac drivers talked eps vectors.
Early mac print drivers could sometimes be used as the poor-man's eps
driver to convert plain text to an eps file. As a bonus, if you also knew
something about eps, you could also set positions and sizes too.


On July 31, 2017 10:52:25 PM Evan Aad wrote:

> Thank you, Abraham, but this is not quite what I don't understand. Let
> me try to explain myself better.
>
> Suppose I'm a printer living in England 200 years ago, and suppose I
> wish to print an upright 'a' in the 'Times' typeface. I consult a list
> of the available font sizes for Times and see that the available sizes
> are 10pt, 11pt and 14pt. I decide to use 14pt. I open the cabinet where
> the Times printing blocks are stored, open the drawer with the label
> '14pt', and take out the 'upright' tray from which I take the 'a'
> block.
>
> Now suppose I am a PDF driver in a macOS operating system instructed to
> print an upright 14pt Times New Roman 'a' at a certain coordinate on a
> PDF page. What are my next steps?

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Abraham Lee
In reply to this post by Evan Aad

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 11:53 PM Evan Aad <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thank you, Abraham, but this is not quite what I don't understand. Let me try to explain myself better.

Let me try again...

Suppose I'm a printer living in England 200 years ago, and suppose I wish to print an upright 'a' in the 'Times' typeface. I consult a list of the available font sizes for Times and see that the available sizes are 10pt, 11pt and 14pt. I decide to use 14pt. I open the cabinet where the Times printing blocks are stored, open the drawer with the label '14pt', and take out the 'upright' tray from which I take the 'a' block.

When you take an 'a' from this 14pt drawer, the block is physically 14pt tall, not the 'a' shape itself. It probably occupies more like 7pt of vertical space on the block, with 4pt empty space above and 3pt below it. This 14pt set was filed and punched to this specific size, meaning that the design was adjusted to be optically correct at this size. Likewise the 10pt case, which has smaller blocks, has letter forms specifically tuned to look good at that size, but still look like those in the 14pt case.

Now suppose I am a PDF driver in a macOS operating system instructed to print an upright 14pt Times New Roman 'a' at a certain coordinate on a PDF page. What are my next steps?

Fundamentally, we're talking about something else entirely now because we no longer have distinct blocks for different sizes*. In Times New Roman (and I'm making these numbers up since I'm not at a normal computer to check, but I think you'll get the idea), the letter a's height is 450 upm (units-per-em), where a normal font's full height (or "em") goes from -200 to +800 upm = 1000. These numbers have no correlation to a real printed dimension (like 14pt), they just provide a relative scale to base everything off of.

When you send instructions to the PDF driver to print the letter 'a' at 14pt, what ends up happening is the font's em gets scaled to be physically so that 14pt = 1000upm, which means that the font extends below the baseline by 14*-200/1000 = -2.8pt, and likewise extends above the baseline by 11.2pt. By the same math, we determine the 'a' will end up being drawn with a height of 14*450/1000 = 6.3pt. Only now does the font have a "size" in the printed sense.

There is an OpenType feature "size" which may be used to designate an intended printed size (similar to the physical blocks), but more often than not, it isn't used or the apps that use the fonts don't utilize it. Instead, the font designer may designate a size category such as "caption", "text", "subheading", "display", "poster", etc. in the name of the font to hint that the design is better suited for a particular size range. You will usually only find this naming convention if there are multiple optical weights in the font's family. Most likely, however, such a distinction is not part of the font's design, and the font had no intended print size. Some do, some don't. Most won't tell you specifically, only notionally and that's not likely stored as a number in the font.

Best,
Abraham

*Unless the designer creates multiple optical sizes of the same font, but this is less common and even then, there's nothing stopping you from using a design at 36pt that was intended for 6pt print.


On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 7:10 AM, Abraham Lee <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Evan!

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 8:42 PM, Evan Aad <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks, Gé. So when I ask some typeface for a certain character at size, say, 18pt. What is it exactly that is 18pt? Samuel gave an answer before that I though I understood, but now I'm not so sure any more, since different characters have a different height, for instance, h vs. c.

Sorting out the terms in typography is confusing at first, but very important. Historically, the "point size" of a font (or typeface) was the measure of the bottom of the lowest decender (like bottom of "q" and "j") to the top of the highest ascender (like the top of "l" or "h"). Inside a modern font these two numbers exist, regardless of the shape of the glyphs (but will closely match on well-designed/defined fonts) and generally define the distance from one line to the next. This is the measurement you are technically talking about when you say "I want the font to be 18pt". In other words, the font is scaled so that the distance from the descent line to the ascent line is 18pt.

There are so many important typography 
terms to know. For me, I found the following graphic to be REALLY helpful when I was trying to understand font lingo.


Hope that helps,
Abraham

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Evan Aad
In reply to this post by Gé van Gasteren-2
Thank you! This was very clear and helpful. Let me see if I got it. Please let me know whether the following statements are correct.

1. All the glyphs in a given typeface are designed on a canvas that is the same height, and this height is measured in length units called upm, right? Different glyphs may be designed on canvases of different widths, but they always have the same height.

2. The typeface has a numerical property 'baseline' that designates a point along the canvas's left edge where the canvas's origin is, so for instance a Times New Roman's baseline property might be '20' which means that the origin of every canvas on which Times New Roman glyphs are designed lies along the canvas's left edge 20% above the bottom edge.

3. When a rendering engine, like a PDF driver, wants to typeset a character of a certain typeface, the engine itself must provide the physical size; this information is not part of the typeface.

4. Suppose a rendering engine wants to typeset a certain character at some size, say 14pt, the engine doesn't even have to know what character it is, and whether it's upright or italic, etc., in order to allocate the correct amount of vertical space, since all 14pt glyphs of the typeface will occupy the same total amount of vertical space, where by 'total' I mean that said space includes the space above and below the actual glyph. The horizontal space depends on the character, but not the vertical space.

5. When the engine gets down to actually drawing a glyph at a certain coordinate on the page, it identifies this page coordinate with the origin of the glyph's canvas, and it defines 1upm to be equal to fontsize-in-pt/canvas-height-in-upm (e.g. 14pt/1000upm).

On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 10:20 AM, Abraham Lee <[hidden email]> wrote:

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 11:53 PM Evan Aad <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thank you, Abraham, but this is not quite what I don't understand. Let me try to explain myself better.

Let me try again...

Suppose I'm a printer living in England 200 years ago, and suppose I wish to print an upright 'a' in the 'Times' typeface. I consult a list of the available font sizes for Times and see that the available sizes are 10pt, 11pt and 14pt. I decide to use 14pt. I open the cabinet where the Times printing blocks are stored, open the drawer with the label '14pt', and take out the 'upright' tray from which I take the 'a' block.

When you take an 'a' from this 14pt drawer, the block is physically 14pt tall, not the 'a' shape itself. It probably occupies more like 7pt of vertical space on the block, with 4pt empty space above and 3pt below it. This 14pt set was filed and punched to this specific size, meaning that the design was adjusted to be optically correct at this size. Likewise the 10pt case, which has smaller blocks, has letter forms specifically tuned to look good at that size, but still look like those in the 14pt case.

Now suppose I am a PDF driver in a macOS operating system instructed to print an upright 14pt Times New Roman 'a' at a certain coordinate on a PDF page. What are my next steps?

Fundamentally, we're talking about something else entirely now because we no longer have distinct blocks for different sizes*. In Times New Roman (and I'm making these numbers up since I'm not at a normal computer to check, but I think you'll get the idea), the letter a's height is 450 upm (units-per-em), where a normal font's full height (or "em") goes from -200 to +800 upm = 1000. These numbers have no correlation to a real printed dimension (like 14pt), they just provide a relative scale to base everything off of.

When you send instructions to the PDF driver to print the letter 'a' at 14pt, what ends up happening is the font's em gets scaled to be physically so that 14pt = 1000upm, which means that the font extends below the baseline by 14*-200/1000 = -2.8pt, and likewise extends above the baseline by 11.2pt. By the same math, we determine the 'a' will end up being drawn with a height of 14*450/1000 = 6.3pt. Only now does the font have a "size" in the printed sense.

There is an OpenType feature "size" which may be used to designate an intended printed size (similar to the physical blocks), but more often than not, it isn't used or the apps that use the fonts don't utilize it. Instead, the font designer may designate a size category such as "caption", "text", "subheading", "display", "poster", etc. in the name of the font to hint that the design is better suited for a particular size range. You will usually only find this naming convention if there are multiple optical weights in the font's family. Most likely, however, such a distinction is not part of the font's design, and the font had no intended print size. Some do, some don't. Most won't tell you specifically, only notionally and that's not likely stored as a number in the font.

Best,
Abraham

*Unless the designer creates multiple optical sizes of the same font, but this is less common and even then, there's nothing stopping you from using a design at 36pt that was intended for 6pt print.


On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 7:10 AM, Abraham Lee <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Evan!

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 8:42 PM, Evan Aad <[hidden email]wrote:
Thanks, Gé. So when I ask some typeface for a certain character at size, say, 18pt. What is it exactly that is 18pt? Samuel gave an answer before that I though I understood, but now I'm not so sure any more, since different characters have a different height, for instance, h vs. c.

Sorting out the terms in typography is confusing at first, but very important. Historically, the "point size" of a font (or typeface) was the measure of the bottom of the lowest decender (like bottom of "q" and "j") to the top of the highest ascender (like the top of "l" or "h"). Inside a modern font these two numbers exist, regardless of the shape of the glyphs (but will closely match on well-designed/defined fonts) and generally define the distance from one line to the next. This is the measurement you are technically talking about when you say "I want the font to be 18pt". In other words, the font is scaled so that the distance from the descent line to the ascent line is 18pt.

There are so many important typography 
terms to know. For me, I found the following graphic to be REALLY helpful when I was trying to understand font lingo.


Hope that helps,
Abraham

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

MMacD
Pretty much, yes.  

To visualise it more easily, think about designing for physical
type.

Imagine that, for reasons best known to yourself if anyone, you
decide to put visible glyphs on greatly-oversized slugs.

So for every slug size ( = point size) you put a glyph on the
baseline that's the same size a superscript glyph would be on a
normal font.  So if your x height in a normal 10pt font would be,
say, 6pt, and the superscript would be, say, 3pt, you put those
3pt glyphs on the slugs instead of 6pt glyphs, leaving 7pt of air
rather thn 4..  

Now, with physical type there's no way to decrease the line size
below that of the slug's height  except by physically mutilating
every slug.  So anyone who uses your new font is going to have
*very* well-spaced lines.  No matter that they're composing in
12pt "set solid" (no leading, aka "12 on 12" or "12/12" ), it's
going to look Really Weird.

That's what the "natural size" is all about:  filling up the
slugs such that, set solid, your font presents a pleasing,
readable appearance with just enough air around each glyph not to
make the glyphs/lines look jammed-together.

Hope that image helps.

On Tue, 1 Aug 2017 11:18:09 +0300, you wrote:

>Thank you! This was very clear and helpful. Let me see if I got it. Please
>let me know whether the following statements are correct.
>
>1. All the glyphs in a given typeface are designed on a canvas that is the
>same height, and this height is measured in length units called upm, right?
>Different glyphs may be designed on canvases of different widths, but they
>always have the same height.
>
>2. The typeface has a numerical property 'baseline' that designates a point
>along the canvas's left edge where the canvas's origin is, so for instance
>a Times New Roman's baseline property might be '20' which means that the
>origin of every canvas on which Times New Roman glyphs are designed lies
>along the canvas's left edge 20% above the bottom edge.
>
>3. When a rendering engine, like a PDF driver, wants to typeset a character
>of a certain typeface, the engine itself must provide the physical size;
>this information is not part of the typeface.
>
>4. Suppose a rendering engine wants to typeset a certain character at some
>size, say 14pt, the engine doesn't even have to know what character it is,
>and whether it's upright or italic, etc., in order to allocate the correct
>amount of vertical space, since all 14pt glyphs of the typeface will occupy
>the same total amount of vertical space, where by 'total' I mean that said
>space includes the space above and below the actual glyph. The horizontal
>space depends on the character, but not the vertical space.
>
>5. When the engine gets down to actually drawing a glyph at a certain
>coordinate on the page, it identifies this page coordinate with the origin
>of the glyph's canvas, and it defines 1upm to be equal to
>fontsize-in-pt/canvas-height-in-upm (e.g. 14pt/1000upm).
>
>On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 10:20 AM, Abraham Lee <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
>>
>> On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 11:53 PM Evan Aad <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> Thank you, Abraham, but this is not quite what I don't understand. Let me
>>> try to explain myself better.
>>
>>
>> Let me try again...
>>
>> Suppose I'm a printer living in England 200 years ago, and suppose I wish
>>> to print an upright 'a' in the 'Times' typeface. I consult a list of the
>>> available font sizes for Times and see that the available sizes are 10pt,
>>> 11pt and 14pt. I decide to use 14pt. I open the cabinet where the Times
>>> printing blocks are stored, open the drawer with the label '14pt', and take
>>> out the 'upright' tray from which I take the 'a' block.
>>>
>>
>> When you take an 'a' from this 14pt drawer, the block is physically 14pt
>> tall, not the 'a' shape itself. It probably occupies more like 7pt of
>> vertical space on the block, with 4pt empty space above and 3pt below it.
>> This 14pt set was filed and punched to this specific size, meaning that the
>> design was adjusted to be optically correct at this size. Likewise the 10pt
>> case, which has smaller blocks, has letter forms specifically tuned to look
>> good at that size, but still look like those in the 14pt case.
>>
>> Now suppose I am a PDF driver in a macOS operating system instructed to
>>> print an upright 14pt Times New Roman 'a' at a certain coordinate on a PDF
>>> page. What are my next steps?
>>>
>>
>> Fundamentally, we're talking about something else entirely now because we
>> no longer have distinct blocks for different sizes*. In Times New Roman
>> (and I'm making these numbers up since I'm not at a normal computer to
>> check, but I think you'll get the idea), the letter a's height is 450 upm
>> (units-per-em), where a normal font's full height (or "em") goes from -200
>> to +800 upm = 1000. These numbers have no correlation to a real printed
>> dimension (like 14pt), they just provide a relative scale to base
>> everything off of.
>>
>> When you send instructions to the PDF driver to print the letter 'a' at
>> 14pt, what ends up happening is the font's em gets scaled to be physically
>> so that 14pt = 1000upm, which means that the font extends below the
>> baseline by 14*-200/1000 = -2.8pt, and likewise extends above the baseline
>> by 11.2pt. By the same math, we determine the 'a' will end up being drawn
>> with a height of 14*450/1000 = 6.3pt. Only now does the font have a "size"
>> in the printed sense.
>>
>> There is an OpenType feature "size" which may be used to designate an
>> intended printed size (similar to the physical blocks), but more often than
>> not, it isn't used or the apps that use the fonts don't utilize it.
>> Instead, the font designer may designate a size category such as "caption",
>> "text", "subheading", "display", "poster", etc. in the name of the font to
>> hint that the design is better suited for a particular size range. You will
>> usually only find this naming convention if there are multiple optical
>> weights in the font's family. Most likely, however, such a distinction is
>> not part of the font's design, and the font had no intended print size.
>> Some do, some don't. Most won't tell you specifically, only notionally and
>> that's not likely stored as a number in the font.
>>
>> Best,
>> Abraham
>>
>> *Unless the designer creates multiple optical sizes of the same font, but
>> this is less common and even then, there's nothing stopping you from using
>> a design at 36pt that was intended for 6pt print.
>>
>>
>>> On Tue, Aug 1, 2017 at 7:10 AM, Abraham Lee <[hidden email]
>>> > wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hi, Evan!
>>>>
>>>> On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 8:42 PM, Evan Aad <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Thanks, Gé. So when I ask some typeface for a certain character at
>>>>> size, say, 18pt. What is it exactly that is 18pt? Samuel gave an answer
>>>>> before that I though I understood, but now I'm not so sure any more, since
>>>>> different characters have a different height, for instance, h vs. c.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Sorting out the terms in typography is confusing at first, but very
>>>> important. Historically, the "point size" of a font (or typeface) was
>>>> the measure of the bottom of the lowest decender (like bottom of "q" and
>>>> "j") to the top of the highest ascender (like the top of "l" or "h").
>>>> Inside a modern font these two numbers exist, regardless of the shape of
>>>> the glyphs (but will closely match on well-designed/defined fonts) and
>>>> generally define the distance from one line to the next. This is the
>>>> measurement you are technically talking about when you say "I want the font
>>>> to be 18pt". In other words, the font is scaled so that the distance from
>>>> the descent line to the ascent line is 18pt.
>>>>
>>>> There are so many important typography
>>>> terms to know. For me, I found the following graphic to be REALLY
>>>> helpful when I was trying to understand font lingo.
>>>>
>>>> https://abigailfeniza.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/anatomy-of-type.png
>>>>
>>>> Hope that helps,
>>>> Abraham
>>>>
>>>
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>>
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