How to determine a font's natural size?

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How to determine a font's natural size?

Evan Aad
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Dave Crossland-2
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Dave Crossland
In reply to this post by Evan Aad
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Evan Aad
In reply to this post by Evan Aad
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Dave Crossland
The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Evan Aad
In reply to this post by Evan Aad
I see how it would be inherent in a potato, but I don't see how it is inherent in font data, considering your previous statement that the font size "isn't recorded in the font."

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 3:42 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Samuel Sutherland
Fonts are designed by people. These people often design a font with particular font sizes in mind - this isn't something the computer needs to know or even something all fonts have, but it will affect what sizes a font looks good at. So no, it's not recorded in the file, but yes, many fonts have a default size they look good at 

On 31 Jul 2017 14:02, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I see how it would be inherent in a potato, but I don't see how it is inherent in font data, considering your previous statement that the font size "isn't recorded in the font."

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 3:42 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Dave Crossland
In reply to this post by Evan Aad
You can use a font designed for use at 6pt at 600pt, but that would be up to you. 

On 31 July 2017 at 09:01, Evan Aad <[hidden email]> wrote:
I see how it would be inherent in a potato, but I don't see how it is inherent in font data, considering your previous statement that the font size "isn't recorded in the font."

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 3:42 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).

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--
Cheers
Dave

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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Martin B. Brilliant
In reply to this post by Dave Crossland
I’m confused. How can you tell how much of the proportions of the letterforms are dependent on the optical size and how much on the design of the typeface?

Is it like obscenity: “I can’t define it but I know it when I see it”?

On Jul 31, 2017, at 8:42 AM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:

The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).


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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Samuel Sutherland
It's entirely subjective. 
As Dave said, you can use a font that was designed at 6pt at 600pt but it might well look ugly - that's entirely subjective. There is no way to know outright what size a font was designed at seeing the font only, it's entirely down to the personality of the designer. 


On 31 Jul 2017 16:43, "Martin B. Brilliant" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I’m confused. How can you tell how much of the proportions of the letterforms are dependent on the optical size and how much on the design of the typeface?

Is it like obscenity: “I can’t define it but I know it when I see it”?

On Jul 31, 2017, at 8:42 AM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:

The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).


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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Evan Aad
In reply to this post by Evan Aad
I don't know. As I wrote, "I was told." Personally, I have no idea what optical size even means.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 6:41 PM, Martin B. Brilliant <[hidden email]> wrote:
I’m confused. How can you tell how much of the proportions of the letterforms are dependent on the optical size and how much on the design of the typeface?

Is it like obscenity: “I can’t define it but I know it when I see it”?

On Jul 31, 2017, at 8:42 AM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:

The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).


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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Max Rabkin-2

What you were told is basically wrong or at least misleading.

Certainly when I design a font, it's absolutely *not* designed at a single size. I draw and test at a range of sizes, since the font will be *used* at a range of sizes. It may look better at some sizes than others (a single font is unlikely to look good at 6pt and at 72pt).

"Designed for 11pt" is like "designed for name tags of pet crocodiles": it might be true of a certain font, but the only way of knowing is if the designer told us. And "suitable for 11pt" is, like "suitable for name tags of pet crocodiles" an aesthetic judgement.

"Optical sizes" of a typeface are different (but similar) fonts, that the designer considers suitable for a certain size (or range of sizes). So I might design a typeface "Crocodile Roman", including "Crocodile Roman Tiny" (suitable for 4-8pt), "Crocodile Roman Text" (8-12pt), "Crocodile Roman Heading" (14-24pt) and "Crocodile Roman Display" (above 24pt). The sizes are just suggestions, and you could use any of them at any size (and if you are printing text that is to be viewed from far away like on a billboard, you might use the Text size even though the physical size is hundreds of points).

Hope that clears it up.


On 2017/07/31 17:47, Evan Aad wrote:
I don't know. As I wrote, "I was told." Personally, I have no idea what optical size even means.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 6:41 PM, Martin B. Brilliant <[hidden email]> wrote:
I’m confused. How can you tell how much of the proportions of the letterforms are dependent on the optical size and how much on the design of the typeface?

Is it like obscenity: “I can’t define it but I know it when I see it”?

On Jul 31, 2017, at 8:42 AM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:

The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).


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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Evan Aad
In reply to this post by Evan Aad
Thanks, everyone. I just want to clarify one last point, please. Please tell me if I understand correctly.

When a font designer designs a font, they make the code dependent on several unspecified parameters, one of which is called "size". The typeface code may or may not make use of this parameter, and if it does make use of this parameter, there are no inherent requirements about how to use it and what it is supposed to mean. However, frequently in practice the size parameter is the length of the bounding box of the letter x, if this character is in the font;s domain.

When the user instantiates a font from the typeface, they pass as many arguments as there are parameters, and the argument passed to the parameter "size" is, by definition, the font's size.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 7:05 PM, Max Rabkin <[hidden email]> wrote:

What you were told is basically wrong or at least misleading.

Certainly when I design a font, it's absolutely *not* designed at a single size. I draw and test at a range of sizes, since the font will be *used* at a range of sizes. It may look better at some sizes than others (a single font is unlikely to look good at 6pt and at 72pt).

"Designed for 11pt" is like "designed for name tags of pet crocodiles": it might be true of a certain font, but the only way of knowing is if the designer told us. And "suitable for 11pt" is, like "suitable for name tags of pet crocodiles" an aesthetic judgement.

"Optical sizes" of a typeface are different (but similar) fonts, that the designer considers suitable for a certain size (or range of sizes). So I might design a typeface "Crocodile Roman", including "Crocodile Roman Tiny" (suitable for 4-8pt), "Crocodile Roman Text" (8-12pt), "Crocodile Roman Heading" (14-24pt) and "Crocodile Roman Display" (above 24pt). The sizes are just suggestions, and you could use any of them at any size (and if you are printing text that is to be viewed from far away like on a billboard, you might use the Text size even though the physical size is hundreds of points).

Hope that clears it up.


On 2017/07/31 17:47, Evan Aad wrote:
I don't know. As I wrote, "I was told." Personally, I have no idea what optical size even means.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 6:41 PM, Martin B. Brilliant <[hidden email]> wrote:
I’m confused. How can you tell how much of the proportions of the letterforms are dependent on the optical size and how much on the design of the typeface?

Is it like obscenity: “I can’t define it but I know it when I see it”?

On Jul 31, 2017, at 8:42 AM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:

The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]>                                                   wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).


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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Samuel Sutherland
When a font is created, it's created in reference to an invisible grid, and when you use the font and set it to 12pt, you set it so that the height of that grid is 1/6" tall (72pt=1")
It is true that this grid has a size, often either 1000 or a power of 2, but this only affects the precision of the curves inside this imaginary grid - the height of which is set by the font size in whatever is rendering the font

On 31 Jul 2017 17:35, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks, everyone. I just want to clarify one last point, please. Please tell me if I understand correctly.

When a font designer designs a font, they make the code dependent on several unspecified parameters, one of which is called "size". The typeface code may or may not make use of this parameter, and if it does make use of this parameter, there are no inherent requirements about how to use it and what it is supposed to mean. However, frequently in practice the size parameter is the length of the bounding box of the letter x, if this character is in the font;s domain.

When the user instantiates a font from the typeface, they pass as many arguments as there are parameters, and the argument passed to the parameter "size" is, by definition, the font's size.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 7:05 PM, Max Rabkin <[hidden email]> wrote:

What you were told is basically wrong or at least misleading.

Certainly when I design a font, it's absolutely *not* designed at a single size. I draw and test at a range of sizes, since the font will be *used* at a range of sizes. It may look better at some sizes than others (a single font is unlikely to look good at 6pt and at 72pt).

"Designed for 11pt" is like "designed for name tags of pet crocodiles": it might be true of a certain font, but the only way of knowing is if the designer told us. And "suitable for 11pt" is, like "suitable for name tags of pet crocodiles" an aesthetic judgement.

"Optical sizes" of a typeface are different (but similar) fonts, that the designer considers suitable for a certain size (or range of sizes). So I might design a typeface "Crocodile Roman", including "Crocodile Roman Tiny" (suitable for 4-8pt), "Crocodile Roman Text" (8-12pt), "Crocodile Roman Heading" (14-24pt) and "Crocodile Roman Display" (above 24pt). The sizes are just suggestions, and you could use any of them at any size (and if you are printing text that is to be viewed from far away like on a billboard, you might use the Text size even though the physical size is hundreds of points).

Hope that clears it up.


On 2017/07/31 17:47, Evan Aad wrote:
I don't know. As I wrote, "I was told." Personally, I have no idea what optical size even means.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 6:41 PM, Martin B. Brilliant <[hidden email]> wrote:
I’m confused. How can you tell how much of the proportions of the letterforms are dependent on the optical size and how much on the design of the typeface?

Is it like obscenity: “I can’t define it but I know it when I see it”?

On Jul 31, 2017, at 8:42 AM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:

The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]>                                                   wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).


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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Evan Aad
In reply to this post by Evan Aad
Thanks, Samuel. Now I get it.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 8:25 PM, Samuel Sutherland <[hidden email]> wrote:
When a font is created, it's created in reference to an invisible grid, and when you use the font and set it to 12pt, you set it so that the height of that grid is 1/6" tall (72pt=1")
It is true that this grid has a size, often either 1000 or a power of 2, but this only affects the precision of the curves inside this imaginary grid - the height of which is set by the font size in whatever is rendering the font

On 31 Jul 2017 17:35, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks, everyone. I just want to clarify one last point, please. Please tell me if I understand correctly.

When a font designer designs a font, they make the code dependent on several unspecified parameters, one of which is called "size". The typeface code may or may not make use of this parameter, and if it does make use of this parameter, there are no inherent requirements about how to use it and what it is supposed to mean. However, frequently in practice the size parameter is the length of the bounding box of the letter x, if this character is in the font;s domain.

When the user instantiates a font from the typeface, they pass as many arguments as there are parameters, and the argument passed to the parameter "size" is, by definition, the font's size.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 7:05 PM, Max Rabkin <[hidden email]> wrote:

What you were told is basically wrong or at least misleading.

Certainly when I design a font, it's absolutely *not* designed at a single size. I draw and test at a range of sizes, since the font will be *used* at a range of sizes. It may look better at some sizes than others (a single font is unlikely to look good at 6pt and at 72pt).

"Designed for 11pt" is like "designed for name tags of pet crocodiles": it might be true of a certain font, but the only way of knowing is if the designer told us. And "suitable for 11pt" is, like "suitable for name tags of pet crocodiles" an aesthetic judgement.

"Optical sizes" of a typeface are different (but similar) fonts, that the designer considers suitable for a certain size (or range of sizes). So I might design a typeface "Crocodile Roman", including "Crocodile Roman Tiny" (suitable for 4-8pt), "Crocodile Roman Text" (8-12pt), "Crocodile Roman Heading" (14-24pt) and "Crocodile Roman Display" (above 24pt). The sizes are just suggestions, and you could use any of them at any size (and if you are printing text that is to be viewed from far away like on a billboard, you might use the Text size even though the physical size is hundreds of points).

Hope that clears it up.


On 2017/07/31 17:47, Evan Aad wrote:
I don't know. As I wrote, "I was told." Personally, I have no idea what optical size even means.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 6:41 PM, Martin B. Brilliant <[hidden email]> wrote:
I’m confused. How can you tell how much of the proportions of the letterforms are dependent on the optical size and how much on the design of the typeface?

Is it like obscenity: “I can’t define it but I know it when I see it”?

On Jul 31, 2017, at 8:42 AM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:

The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]>                                                   wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).


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Re: How to determine a font's natural size?

Dave Crossland
In reply to this post by Max Rabkin-2
Love the Crocodiles example Max!! :) 

On 31 July 2017 at 12:05, Max Rabkin <[hidden email]> wrote:

What you were told is basically wrong or at least misleading.

Certainly when I design a font, it's absolutely *not* designed at a single size. I draw and test at a range of sizes, since the font will be *used* at a range of sizes. It may look better at some sizes than others (a single font is unlikely to look good at 6pt and at 72pt).

"Designed for 11pt" is like "designed for name tags of pet crocodiles": it might be true of a certain font, but the only way of knowing is if the designer told us. And "suitable for 11pt" is, like "suitable for name tags of pet crocodiles" an aesthetic judgement.

"Optical sizes" of a typeface are different (but similar) fonts, that the designer considers suitable for a certain size (or range of sizes). So I might design a typeface "Crocodile Roman", including "Crocodile Roman Tiny" (suitable for 4-8pt), "Crocodile Roman Text" (8-12pt), "Crocodile Roman Heading" (14-24pt) and "Crocodile Roman Display" (above 24pt). The sizes are just suggestions, and you could use any of them at any size (and if you are printing text that is to be viewed from far away like on a billboard, you might use the Text size even though the physical size is hundreds of points).

Hope that clears it up.


On 2017/07/31 17:47, Evan Aad wrote:
I don't know. As I wrote, "I was told." Personally, I have no idea what optical size even means.

On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 6:41 PM, Martin B. Brilliant <[hidden email]> wrote:
I’m confused. How can you tell how much of the proportions of the letterforms are dependent on the optical size and how much on the design of the typeface?

Is it like obscenity: “I can’t define it but I know it when I see it”?

On Jul 31, 2017, at 8:42 AM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:

The proportions of the letterforms. this is inherent if the letterforms are expressed in font data, wood, metal, or potato 

On Jul 31, 2017 4:19 AM, "Evan Aad" <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks. What do you mean by a *natural* property of the TypeFace?

On Sun, Jul 30, 2017 at 10:10 PM, Dave Crossland <[hidden email]> wrote:
This isn't recorded in the font. It's a natural property of the Typeface.

On Jul 30, 2017 5:09 AM, "EvenEven Odd" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I was told that, unless a font has optical sizes (e.g. Latin Modern), it is designed at a single size. I was told that this size should be in the font information. How can I determine this size with FontForge or otherwise? I run macOS Sierra v. 10.12.6 (the most recent).


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--
Cheers
Dave

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